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European Neighbourhood Policy (ENP)

The EU has a huge influence on the countries queuing up to join the club. The carrot of membership gives Brussels a big stick with which to beat candidates into adopting, well, pretty much anything Brussels says they should adopt, from laws to strengthen democracy and human rights to the mountains of technical legislation that form the bedrock of the single market. The ENP is an attempt by the EU to have a similar sway over countries that have little chance of ever becoming full members. It was launched in 2004 and applies to both the EU's southern and eastern neighbours: Algeria, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Egypt, Georgia, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Libya, Moldova, Morocco, the Palestinian Authority, Syria, Tunisia and Ukraine. According to the Commission, the ENP is supposed to go "beyond existing relationships to offer a deeper political relationship and economic integration". But critics say the policy has failed to deliver anything concrete and that the EU has yet to prove that it has anything substantial to offer those countries it does not wish to let past the bouncers at its door.